Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP)

Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an inherited disorder characterized by cancer of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. People with the classic type of FAP may begin to develop multiple noncancerous (benign) growths (polyps) in the colon as early as their teenage years. Unless the colon is removed, these polyps will become malignant (cancerous). The average age at which an individual develops colon cancer in classic FAP is 39 years. Some people have a variant of the disorder, called attenuated FAP, in which polyp growth is delayed. The average age of colorectal cancer onset for attenuated FAP is 55 years.
Cancer Prevention Continum
In people with classic FAP, the number of polyps increases with age, and hundreds to thousands of polyps can develop in the colon. Also of particular significance are noncancerous growths called desmoid tumors. These fibrous tumors usually occur in the tissue covering the intestines and may be provoked by surgery to remove the colon. Desmoid tumors tend to recur after they are surgically removed. In both classic FAP and its attenuated variant, benign and malignant tumors are sometimes found in other places in the body, including the duodenum (a section of the small intestine), stomach, bones, skin, and other tissues. People who have colon polyps as well as growths outside the colon are sometimes described as having Gardner syndrome.

CPP’s lead combination therapy product CPP-1X/sul is being developed to minimize the occurrence and/or recurrence of problematic polyps and tumors associated with this debilitating disease.